Be Your Own Nutritionist

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  • Dipublikasikan tanggal 20 Jul 2011
  • *** A better quality version of this talk is now available here:
    idclips.com/video/Apu4EPyIsPg/video.html
    A presentation by William Harris, M.D..
    In this presentation, Dr. Harris cuts through the maze of contradictory diet recommendations to show how a few simple food rules and a little exercise will insure your best chances for good health.
    A vegetarian since 1950, vegan since 1964, William Harris, M.D. is a founding and current director of the Vegetarian Society of Hawaii. Prior to his retirement he was an emergency physician and director of the Kaiser Permanente Vegetarian Lifestyle Clinic. He received his medical degree from the University of California, San Francisco in 1963 and is the author of The Scientific Basis of Vegetarianism, now online free at www.vegsource.com/harris/book_contents.htm Last December he marked his 80th birthday with an 8-way parachute jump, his 1180th, at Pacific Sky Diving on Oahu.
    Filming and editing by Dr William Harris M.D. on July 12, 2010 at Ala Wai Golf Course Clubhouse, Honolulu, Hawaii
    Sponsored by: Vegetarian Society of Hawaii www.vsh.org

Komentar • 33

  • JC
    JC 5 tahun yang lalu +1

    the music during the skydive is terrible

    • GOLDENFLY WARRIOR
      GOLDENFLY WARRIOR 4 tahun yang lalu

      WHO CARES! THE INFO IS PRICELESS!

    • Jennifer Wambaa
      Jennifer Wambaa 4 tahun yang lalu +1

      I agree with you, and I love jazz. Cheers to eating plant strong!

  • gyrate4
    gyrate4 5 tahun yang lalu

    He looks wonderful at his age! I hope I'll be that active at that age!

  • Just Once
    Just Once 5 tahun yang lalu

    great!!

  • Tim Eaton
    Tim Eaton 6 tahun yang lalu

    Not so great for your arteries.

  • Tim Eaton
    Tim Eaton 6 tahun yang lalu

    This guy looks amazing for his age.

  • vshvideo
    vshvideo  6 tahun yang lalu

    There is not much data available on the effects of cooking B12 in yeast. There are studies on the effect of cooking B12 in meat which show little loss. I sprinkle B12 fortified yeast on my food after it is cooked, and take a B12 supplement.

  • Dreamlife Films
    Dreamlife Films 6 tahun yang lalu

    Regarding adding B12 yeast: does cooking temps affect the B12?

  • manoman0
    manoman0 6 tahun yang lalu

    But olive oil is hell great to cure any skin irritation!

  • George Gallows
    George Gallows 6 tahun yang lalu

    the lady at the start is sexy that's why i suck a plum right now.

  • MeatRocket99
    MeatRocket99 6 tahun yang lalu

    WOW!! Did this guy say he's 80 ??? i thought he was about 58...

  • HARRISMDW001
    HARRISMDW001 6 tahun yang lalu

    That's because science itself is often confusing and contradictory.
    Good luck finding chia seeds (usually in health food stores) and perilla seed (Korean grocery stores.)
    -Bill Harris, M.D.

  • HARRISMDW001
    HARRISMDW001 6 tahun yang lalu

    Soaking or sprouting flaxseed might work, but the USDA has no data for either option. As to whether flax is healthy or not, it's probably fine for most people in moderate usage, but because of it's high content of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) which elongates to eicosopentaenoic acid (EPA) it may cause easy bleeding in some people. Wikipedia mentions " neurotoxic cyanogen glycosides" in flax.

    My own preference is chia or perilla seed for ALA.

  • dilqnas
    dilqnas 6 tahun yang lalu

    yeah my words are a little vague and not scientific at all...what I mean is from a more holistic point of view...if we regard the seed as this sleeping being which in order to wake up needs the best combination of inner and outer forces..then the moment it wakes up as in the moment it sprouts is when it's at its strongest therefore the better nutritional values it has ...omg I should definitely never attempt the sciences:))I just stress the fact that a sprout at day 1 is best for us:))

  • HARRISMDW001
    HARRISMDW001 6 tahun yang lalu

    I'm not sure how you define "potent", "break", and "energy" but there is a long tradition of sprout enthusiasts who insist that sprouts are more nutritious than the seeds from which they came and I have no reason to doubt them. I just now compared soybean sprouts, which meet the RDA/Calorie for all but B12, with soybeans which are deficient in vitamins A, E, C and B12. I suspect most other seeds and their sprouts are comparable because the sprouts are really baby vegetables.

  • dilqnas
    dilqnas 6 tahun yang lalu

    isn't it true that the seed is most potent and nutritious as it just begins to sprout..literally just as it starts to break??? I've heard this from a Bulgarian nutritionist who claims this is when most energy is contained so that the seed is actually strong enough to break and begin to grow? :))

  • TheaDragonSpirit
    TheaDragonSpirit 6 tahun yang lalu

    @vshvideo - Thanks Again! So there are some excepts to the rule. But I guess there is with nearly all rules. :-) Tell William thanks a lot for his great advise. :-) And thanks bill for finding this information out for me, and explaining about Vitamin D.

  • TheaDragonSpirit
    TheaDragonSpirit 6 tahun yang lalu

    @vshvideo - Good Point! :-)

  • vshvideo
    vshvideo  6 tahun yang lalu

    @TheaDragonSpirit Continued from post below...
    I do recommend that everybody get a serum D level periodically, even here in Hawaii, because man-made atmospheric changes have disturbed the ability of some of us to
    make our own D from sunlight exposure.

    If you're one of those people you might need a supplement, but don't take it unless you are because it's toxic in excess.

    Best regards,
    Bill

  • vshvideo
    vshvideo  6 tahun yang lalu

    @TheaDragonSpirit Reply from Dr Harris:
    "Vitamin D" is a misnomer on the part of the establishment. As defined it's
    cholecalciferol and you can get my whole take on that in my IDclips Video:
    Healthcare Reform: Emptying a Flooded Basement without Turning off the Tap: William Harris, M.D. at about 42:50.
    (continued)

  • vshvideo
    vshvideo  6 tahun yang lalu

    @TheaDragonSpirit Reply from Dr Harris:
    As far as I know B12 is made only by bacteria so man only collects it and
    puts it in pills, supplements, and foods. See the B12 section of this video at about 51:39
    Best Regards,
    Bill

  • vshvideo
    vshvideo  6 tahun yang lalu

    @SueMoseley From Dr Harris:
    Dear Sue,

    I can't answer that because the USDA nutrient database has no listing for perilla, chiso, or shiso and I got my data from a perilla seed container label, so even that is suspect and relies on the integrity of the packer.
    My assumption is that perilla sprouts and leaves still have significant ALA (alpha linolenic acid) content but less than that of the seeds.

  • TheaDragonSpirit
    TheaDragonSpirit 6 tahun yang lalu

    @vshvideo - Actually I have just realised, what about B12 or Vitamin D? Should these be supplemented at all? These are man made.
    I assume by man made he means refined from it's original form?

  • TheaDragonSpirit
    TheaDragonSpirit 6 tahun yang lalu

    @vshvideo - Oh and tell, Dr. Harris thanks for all the great work he does. And thank you for getting a response, without messengers no one would get the message. :-)

  • TheaDragonSpirit
    TheaDragonSpirit 6 tahun yang lalu

    @vshvideo - That's great thanks. So basically - 0 tbsp a day! Ha. That's fine. So as little as possible, but optimum is zero. That's fine. I like those rules. :-)

  • vshvideo
    vshvideo  6 tahun yang lalu

    @TheaDragonSpirit Dr Harris asked me to pass along his response:
    I have two basic rules:
    1. If it has no fiber, don't eat it.
    2. If man made it, don't eat it.
    Since olive oil violates both of those rules I advise against its use.
    (I don't expect anyone to follow it, but recognizing those rules is the
    first step in improving diet.)

  • TheaDragonSpirit
    TheaDragonSpirit 6 tahun yang lalu

    @vshvideo - Thanks for the response. :-) So would he say don't eat any or would 1 Tbsp a day be fine so long as you eat a lot of high fiber foods?

  • vshvideo
    vshvideo  6 tahun yang lalu

    @TheaDragonSpirit Dr Harris asked me pass along his response:
    I think extra virgin cold press organic olive oil is probably the best of a bad lot. Although I use some of it myself I can't endorse it, because as with all oils it's 100% of Calories from fat, the wrong kind of fat with an LA/ALA ratio of 12, has no fiber, and recent data on advanced glycation end products (AGEs) give it a value of 11900 AGE kU/100g. Most fresh vegetables are down in the 100s.

  • TheaDragonSpirit
    TheaDragonSpirit 6 tahun yang lalu

    What does he think of extra virgin cold press organic olive oil?

  • Marina Grubic
    Marina Grubic 7 tahun yang lalu

    Wonderful! Thank You this wonderful educational video!!!!

  • 1imesub
    1imesub 7 tahun yang lalu

    I'm adding this to my favorites. Good job Doc.

  • Michael Teehan
    Michael Teehan 7 tahun yang lalu

    This guy is (or SHOULD be!) THE role model for our children! He is what we should all strive to be. Most 80 year olds I know are walking with walkers or not walking at all!!! Bravo! Dr. Harris!!!!!!!